Common Holiday Hazards For Pets

Common Holiday Hazards for Pets

The holidays are a festive time for the family and the pets as well. However, sometimes with everything going on, the ongoing activities, and constant distractions, it can be easy to overlook any potential dangers to your furry friends. The curious nature of pets such as cats and dogs can lead them to holiday decorations, food, and drinks which could lead them in an emergency and that is a quick way to ruin the holidays. So, it is important to be aware of these items which can be dangerous, so let’s take a look at some common holiday hazards for pets.

Holiday Tinsel & Ornaments

Tinsel, while it is not toxic, can be very attractive to pets, cats in particular. The issue with tinsel is that if it is consumed, it can cause serious injury to your pet. Plus, if it isn’t caught in time, these foreign body ingestions could even be fatal because it will twist and bunches up inside your pet’s intestines. Along with tinsels, bright and colorful tree ornaments can also attract your pet’s curiosity. Your pets may chew and swallow these objects and the broken pieces then form sharp edges that can lacerate their mouth, throat, and intestines.

Gift Wrap Ribbon

It may be tempting to dress your pet up in a decorative ribbon “collar,” but it is important to keep in mind that these can quickly become a choking hazard. Best practices would be to quickly discard the ribbons and bows so that your curious, furry companions won’t be enticed to chew or swallow them. The ingested ribbon is not only a choking hazard but can also twist through the intestines leading to emergency surgery and could be fatal sometimes.

Lights And Wires

You will also want to keep any electrical cords clear from your pets because if they chew on them it can cause serious injuries like electrical shock and oral burns. One way to take these necessary precautions is by using electrical cord covers and cord organizers that will make them less accessible and out of sight.

Toys And Batteries

You will also want to keep small toys and loose batteries off the floor and away from your pet’s mouth. For example, if a dog happens to chew on a hard plastic toy, it can risk breaking its teeth. Batteries along with board game pieces and other small household items can contain zinc and this can cause pancreatitis and renal damage if your pet ingests them. So, if you have some time, be sure to monitor your children’s playtime and pick up any and all toys they have played with. Keep in mind that batteries can also be found in cameras, watches, remote controls, and even in some greeting cards.  

These are just a few of the many different holiday hazards that you will want to keep away from your pet this season. If you have any further questions or concerns, please reach out to Cherrelyn Animal Hospital at (303) 532-1258!

What Your Dog Can and Can’t Eat on Thanksgiving

What Your Dog Can and Can't Eat On Thanksgiving

We have officially entered the Thanksgiving season and it is certainly a time to celebrate and spend time with friends and family as best as we can with the pandemic. Aside from that, many people also have the family pet join in on the festivities. So, with that in mind, it is important to know what you can and can’t feed your dog on the holiday. Therefore, let’s take a look at some of the foods your dog can and can’t eat during Thanksgiving.

Foods Your Dog CAN Eat

Bread: Bread is a safe treat for your dog, as long as it is plain bread. Make sure that it does not include any nuts, raisins, or spices. You also want to make sure that you do not overdo it with the bread as dogs do not gain any nutritional value from bread and like humans, too much can cause weight gain.

Carrots and Celery: If you’re preparing the stuffing, you may be able to provide your furry friend some spare carrots and celery. These vegetables are low in calories while also being full of nutrients and vitamins. Just be sure to first cut them into bite-sized pieces so that they are easier to digest.

Corn: Corn is a common ingredient in many dog foods, so it is perfectly healthy to give your dog to snack on. However, do not give them the cob because that can cause choking or intestinal blockages if it is swallowed.

Cheese: Cheese is a great choice for the occasional treat, as long as your dog is not lactose-intolerant. Be sure to avoid any high or full-fat varieties. A great option would be low or non-fat cottage cheese.

Turkey: Luckily, the usual main dish for most Thanksgiving is also perfectly safe for dogs. Now, before you prepare them a plate, make sure to remove any fat or skin, and never give them the bones because they can splinter and cause tears or blockages within the digestive tract.

Foods Your Dog CANNOT Eat

Chocolate: This has been mentioned previously, but it’s always good to reiterate that you should not feed your dog chocolate as it is highly toxic, especially dark chocolate, and it can stop your dog’s metabolic process resulting in vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, and even death.

Garlic and Onions: Garlic and onions are also highly toxic to dogs and can cause anemia, elevated heart rate, and general weakness. Be sure to remain alert in case your dog may have eaten a stray piece of garlic or onion because the symptoms may not appear for a few days.

Apple Pie: While apple pie is a staple dessert for most Thanksgiving dinners, it would be a terrible idea to feed a slice to your dog. The high-fat crust along with common spice like cinnamon and nutmeg can result in a plethora of issues like upset stomach, liver disease, and high blood pressure. 

So, these tips are here to ensure that you and your family can have a safe and pleasant Thanksgiving holiday that is also safe for your furry friend to join. If you have any additional questions, feel free to contact Cherrelyn Animal Hospital at (303) 532-1258!